Conflict: Middle East

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Conflict: Middle East is a detailed wargame/simulation of the Arab/Israeli Wars from 1973 until the present (1991). The action is historical and hypothetical. You can fight the entire 1973 Arab/Israeli conflict on an operational level as the Israelis or take on the more daunting task of the Arab forces. Choose the hypothetical 1990’s scenario for modern day desert warfare. The game is fought at the Brigade/Division level where you will control every detail of land and air war down to the individual infantry squads, vehicles and gun tubes. You must also keep track of weather, supplies, and politics as they will impact many of your options.

Conflict: Middle East Political Simulator, often known as ConfMEPS or simply Conflict, is a turn-based government simulation game. It was designed by David J. Eastman and published by Virgin Interactive in 1990 for DOS, Atari ST and Amiga (with extended graphics). The game is available for free download at abandonware sites.

The game is set in 1997. The Prime Minister of Israel has just been assassinated, leaving the player to run the country as the new Prime Minister. The player’s objective is to cause the defeat of the neighboring four states, either by invasion (not necessarily by Israel, as the other states can and do invade each other) or political destabilization.

Each game turn represents one month in real time. On each turn, the player decides what diplomatic, espionage and military actions to take with regard to the other countries in the game, and then ends the turn. The game engine then runs and the results of the turn occur (each turn begins in fact with some information about what has occurred in the previous turn being presented as a screen of newspaper headlines).

The actions available to the player are broken up into two phases: Diplomatic/Espionage and Military.

Each country in the game has a diplomatic relationship with every other country, with that relationship varying from Military Pact (best) to War (worst), through a number of stages:

Excellent (Military Pact)
Profitable
Beneficial
Favourable
Workable
Satisfactory
Indifferent
Lamentable
Deplorable
No relations
At War

In addition, there is a special relation mode, called “Attack means disaster” which seems to accrue when all nations with the ability of holding nuclear weapons, possess such. Under such mode, all other relation forms become obsolete.

With each turn, the player directly sets Israeli diplomatic policy with regard to the other countries in the game. Diplomatic policy is very simple: Israel is either trying to improve the diplomatic relationship, keep it as it is, or make it worse. The action change in the relationship for a turn depends upon Israeli policy set against that of the other country; if both are trying to improve, the relationship will improve by one step. If either tries to make the relationship worse, it will deteriorate by one level. Otherwise, it remains steady. Roughly 100 million is taken out of the monthly defense budget when diplomatic relations are being improved beyond Favourable.

If the country’s diplomats are acting aggressively toward Israel, relations will usually not budge, even if the player attempts to improve relations. Bordering states, however, will gradually deteriorate relations with Israel upon showing signs of aggression until war is declared. Relations will not improve if Israel has troops stationed at the border. Some countries will stop acting aggressively toward Israel if the player stations a brigade at the border, but this rarely occurs during gameplay. If Israel successfully bombs Egypt or Syria’s nuclear facilities, relations will drop one level on the next turn.

Some countries will not improve relations with Israel if they are unhappy that the player has at least a Favourable relation with an enemy state or one they do not agree with. For example, if Egypt and Libya are at war, either country will not allow the player to improve relations if both are Favourable with Israel. Another example would be if Iran and Iraq are at war, and Egypt is unhappy that Israel is friendly with Iraq. In both cases, the only solution is for Israel to reduce relations with either country.

When a relationship is Indifferent and Israel decides to reduce the relationship in the diplomatic phase, or if the relationship is at Lamentable, Deplorable or non-existent, Israel can declare war and invade. The only exceptions are Iran, Iraq and Libya – whose diplomatic relations do not go below Indifferent as they do not border Israel.

Some countries at war with another will be quick to form an alliance with Israel if their relations are within Favourable. As a result, the relation will jump to Profitable (skipping Beneficial) on the next turn.

When a relationship is at Profitable, the player can choose to request a military pact. If this is given, then if Israel goes to war with a country which also has a border with the allied country, that country will, in turn, reduce its relationship to Lamentable and then declare war. (Note, however there is no such obligation placed upon the player, who can simply ignore wars their ally enters into).

When an allied country conquers an enemy state, it will often sever its pact with Israel and progressively reduce relations with an aggressive stance (with the neighboring countries doing this until war is declared on Israel). If the country’s relationship with Israel is Favourable at an aggressive stance, but its stability rate is below Fair, it will attempt to keep that relationship level due to its unstable leadership, even if the player attempts to reduce relations. Ordering a successful airstrike on Egypt or Syria’s nuclear installations will reduce relations at a much faster rate at this point and lead to war (unless their governments collapse first).

During a war, the player may attempt to offer a ceasefire with the enemy state, or vice-versa. Once a ceasefire is signed between the warring states, diplomatic relations will be restored to Satisfactory, but with the opposing country’s diplomats acting aggressively towards Israel. This will once again plunge both countries into war within the next couple of turns.

Each country’s government has a stability rating. If that rating falls to the lowest value, the government collapses and the country is out of the game. Within each turn, for each country in the game, Israel can choose to work to reduce the stability of the Government, keep it as it is, or increase the stability of the government.

Stability ratings are:
Very solid
Firm
Moderately solid
Good
Fair
Fragile
Weak
Very weak
Dangerously weak
Close to revolution

Also, each country has a level of insurgency, which represents how well-organized the insurgent forces are. Insurgency ratings are:

Ready for action!
Guerilla Force
Strengthening
Ineffective
Disorganised Rabble
Non-existent

When a country conquers an enemy state, its stability rating is upgraded to Very Solid, making it more difficult to destabilize. When a ceasefire between two countries is signed at the next UN Summit, the country that had the advantage on the last turn has its stability upgraded to Very Solid, while the other is downgraded to Good or below.

If a country’s stability rating is Weak or below or if the insurgency in the country is at Guerilla Force or better, Israel can opt to consider extreme measures, which are to attempt assassination of the country’s leader or start a coup. If this attempt succeeds, the country collapses and is out of the game.

There are two ways an assassination attempt can fail. If the failure results in the assassins being arrested, Israel is detected and relations with that country and the West sour. The failure can also result from the country’s leader actually surviving the assassination attempt; the next step would be to stage a coup attempt while that leader is recovering at a hospital. If an attempted coup fails, the insurgent forces are usually destroyed. A coup is very unlikely to succeed unless the insurgents are very strong and the government is very weak, so a premature coup which destroys the insurgency can be a useful strategy for helping a government (often much more effective than disrupting a fast-growing insurgency).
Once diplomatic and espionage policy is set, the player moves on to the military actions. It is not possible to come back to diplomacy and espionage once the player has completed diplomacy and espionage and moved to military actions.

Israel has two ways of becoming unstable: the Palestinian problem – which can be increased by hostile nations, and insecurity of the Israeli public – which occurs if the player does not win a war within two or more years.

Military
The player has two tasks to perform: the first is to spend the defense budget; the second is to set military actions with regard to the other countries in the game.

Defense Budget
On each turn, the player receives a budget to spend on weaponry. The size of the budget seems to depend on the level of hostility in the surrounding countries; if Israel is at war, or if another country is in the process of reducing diplomatic relations to declare war, the budget is large (300 million plus, per turn). If the level of hostility is low, and life is peaceful, the budget is small (100 million).

As such, the defense budget awarded by the game is an indicator of the policy intent of neighboring countries. If they are peaceful, the budget will be small; if one or more countries is bent on war, the budget will be large.

Weapons are bought from the USA, UK, France or a private arms dealer. (Each country sells weapons that it itself produces, except the private dealer, who is a South African providing access to Soviet weaponry.) Each source offers a different range of weapons with different prices and most countries will only offer better weapons once a reasonable number of purchases have already been made (which establishes that a relationship has been built). Not all countries offer all the same weapons; for example, anti-SAM helicopters are only available from the USA and the private dealer.

The weapon systems available for normal combat are:
Main battle tanks (USA/UK/Private Dealer)
Medium tanks (France)
Light tanks (UK/France)
Anti-tank helicopters (USA)
SAM launchers (USA/Private Dealer)
Fighter aircraft (USA/France/Private Dealer)
Bomber aircraft (USA/UK/Private Dealer)
Specialized-function weapon systems available are:
AWACS aircraft (USA/UK)
Strike aircraft (USA)
Anti-SAM helicopters (USA/Private Dealer)
Weapon types are identical as far as war is concerned, regardless of their price: so the 1M USD T-62 Main Battle Tank from the private dealer is exactly the same as the 2M USD M1A1 Main Battle Tank from the USA. Price differences can be significant over a few turns; for example, fighters are 39M USD each from the USA but only 35M USD each from France. Also, the French “medium tank” functions exactly the same as the other dealers’ “heavy tanks”.

All weapons purchased by the user will be available by the next turn, except from the private dealer, which usually takes 1-2 turns to ship. The private dealer’s advantage is the ability to sell arms to the player if an arms embargo is imposed on Israel.

Nuclear Weapon Research
Another factor in the game is the development of nuclear weapons. Each country (except Jordan and Lebanon) can begin and maintain a nuclear weapon development program. One of the main ways to lose the game is for WMDs to be used, which often sets off a global nuclear holocaust. This can present a problem to players, since it can be other countries that use WMDs in their own conflicts against countries other than Israel. It is possible to reduce this possibility by destroying nuclear installations as they arise.

On each turn, the player decides whether to fund nuclear development for that month (it only costs 20M USD and so is usually done). Once the player has nuclear weapons ready, they are able to fire them during war at their discretion. Depending on the situation of the war, the player’s use of WMDs will either result in an instant victory or a nuclear holocaust, which ends the game in a loss. Consequently, if the player wins a war using a nuclear strike, the UN will impose an arms embargo on Israel, forcing the player to buy arms from the private dealer until the next UN summit.

Copyright (C) Wikipedia

SKU: conflict-middle-east Category: Tags: , , ,

Description

Conflict: Middle East is a detailed wargame/simulation of the Arab/Israeli Wars from 1973 until the present (1991). The action is historical and hypothetical. You can fight the entire 1973 Arab/Israeli conflict on an operational level as the Israelis or take on the more daunting task of the Arab forces. Choose the hypothetical 1990’s scenario for modern day desert warfare. The game is fought at the Brigade/Division level where you will control every detail of land and air war down to the individual infantry squads, vehicles and gun tubes. You must also keep track of weather, supplies, and politics as they will impact many of your options.

Conflict: Middle East Political Simulator, often known as ConfMEPS or simply Conflict, is a turn-based government simulation game. It was designed by David J. Eastman and published by Virgin Interactive in 1990 for DOS, Atari ST and Amiga (with extended graphics). The game is available for free download at abandonware sites.

The game is set in 1997. The Prime Minister of Israel has just been assassinated, leaving the player to run the country as the new Prime Minister. The player’s objective is to cause the defeat of the neighboring four states, either by invasion (not necessarily by Israel, as the other states can and do invade each other) or political destabilization.

Each game turn represents one month in real time. On each turn, the player decides what diplomatic, espionage and military actions to take with regard to the other countries in the game, and then ends the turn. The game engine then runs and the results of the turn occur (each turn begins in fact with some information about what has occurred in the previous turn being presented as a screen of newspaper headlines).

The actions available to the player are broken up into two phases: Diplomatic/Espionage and Military.

Each country in the game has a diplomatic relationship with every other country, with that relationship varying from Military Pact (best) to War (worst), through a number of stages:

Excellent (Military Pact)
Profitable
Beneficial
Favourable
Workable
Satisfactory
Indifferent
Lamentable
Deplorable
No relations
At War

In addition, there is a special relation mode, called “Attack means disaster” which seems to accrue when all nations with the ability of holding nuclear weapons, possess such. Under such mode, all other relation forms become obsolete.

With each turn, the player directly sets Israeli diplomatic policy with regard to the other countries in the game. Diplomatic policy is very simple: Israel is either trying to improve the diplomatic relationship, keep it as it is, or make it worse. The action change in the relationship for a turn depends upon Israeli policy set against that of the other country; if both are trying to improve, the relationship will improve by one step. If either tries to make the relationship worse, it will deteriorate by one level. Otherwise, it remains steady. Roughly 100 million is taken out of the monthly defense budget when diplomatic relations are being improved beyond Favourable.

If the country’s diplomats are acting aggressively toward Israel, relations will usually not budge, even if the player attempts to improve relations. Bordering states, however, will gradually deteriorate relations with Israel upon showing signs of aggression until war is declared. Relations will not improve if Israel has troops stationed at the border. Some countries will stop acting aggressively toward Israel if the player stations a brigade at the border, but this rarely occurs during gameplay. If Israel successfully bombs Egypt or Syria’s nuclear facilities, relations will drop one level on the next turn.

Some countries will not improve relations with Israel if they are unhappy that the player has at least a Favourable relation with an enemy state or one they do not agree with. For example, if Egypt and Libya are at war, either country will not allow the player to improve relations if both are Favourable with Israel. Another example would be if Iran and Iraq are at war, and Egypt is unhappy that Israel is friendly with Iraq. In both cases, the only solution is for Israel to reduce relations with either country.

When a relationship is Indifferent and Israel decides to reduce the relationship in the diplomatic phase, or if the relationship is at Lamentable, Deplorable or non-existent, Israel can declare war and invade. The only exceptions are Iran, Iraq and Libya – whose diplomatic relations do not go below Indifferent as they do not border Israel.

Some countries at war with another will be quick to form an alliance with Israel if their relations are within Favourable. As a result, the relation will jump to Profitable (skipping Beneficial) on the next turn.

When a relationship is at Profitable, the player can choose to request a military pact. If this is given, then if Israel goes to war with a country which also has a border with the allied country, that country will, in turn, reduce its relationship to Lamentable and then declare war. (Note, however there is no such obligation placed upon the player, who can simply ignore wars their ally enters into).

When an allied country conquers an enemy state, it will often sever its pact with Israel and progressively reduce relations with an aggressive stance (with the neighboring countries doing this until war is declared on Israel). If the country’s relationship with Israel is Favourable at an aggressive stance, but its stability rate is below Fair, it will attempt to keep that relationship level due to its unstable leadership, even if the player attempts to reduce relations. Ordering a successful airstrike on Egypt or Syria’s nuclear installations will reduce relations at a much faster rate at this point and lead to war (unless their governments collapse first).

During a war, the player may attempt to offer a ceasefire with the enemy state, or vice-versa. Once a ceasefire is signed between the warring states, diplomatic relations will be restored to Satisfactory, but with the opposing country’s diplomats acting aggressively towards Israel. This will once again plunge both countries into war within the next couple of turns.

Each country’s government has a stability rating. If that rating falls to the lowest value, the government collapses and the country is out of the game. Within each turn, for each country in the game, Israel can choose to work to reduce the stability of the Government, keep it as it is, or increase the stability of the government.

Stability ratings are:
Very solid
Firm
Moderately solid
Good
Fair
Fragile
Weak
Very weak
Dangerously weak
Close to revolution

Also, each country has a level of insurgency, which represents how well-organized the insurgent forces are. Insurgency ratings are:

Ready for action!
Guerilla Force
Strengthening
Ineffective
Disorganised Rabble
Non-existent

When a country conquers an enemy state, its stability rating is upgraded to Very Solid, making it more difficult to destabilize. When a ceasefire between two countries is signed at the next UN Summit, the country that had the advantage on the last turn has its stability upgraded to Very Solid, while the other is downgraded to Good or below.

If a country’s stability rating is Weak or below or if the insurgency in the country is at Guerilla Force or better, Israel can opt to consider extreme measures, which are to attempt assassination of the country’s leader or start a coup. If this attempt succeeds, the country collapses and is out of the game.

There are two ways an assassination attempt can fail. If the failure results in the assassins being arrested, Israel is detected and relations with that country and the West sour. The failure can also result from the country’s leader actually surviving the assassination attempt; the next step would be to stage a coup attempt while that leader is recovering at a hospital. If an attempted coup fails, the insurgent forces are usually destroyed. A coup is very unlikely to succeed unless the insurgents are very strong and the government is very weak, so a premature coup which destroys the insurgency can be a useful strategy for helping a government (often much more effective than disrupting a fast-growing insurgency).
Once diplomatic and espionage policy is set, the player moves on to the military actions. It is not possible to come back to diplomacy and espionage once the player has completed diplomacy and espionage and moved to military actions.

Israel has two ways of becoming unstable: the Palestinian problem – which can be increased by hostile nations, and insecurity of the Israeli public – which occurs if the player does not win a war within two or more years.

Military
The player has two tasks to perform: the first is to spend the defense budget; the second is to set military actions with regard to the other countries in the game.

Defense Budget
On each turn, the player receives a budget to spend on weaponry. The size of the budget seems to depend on the level of hostility in the surrounding countries; if Israel is at war, or if another country is in the process of reducing diplomatic relations to declare war, the budget is large (300 million plus, per turn). If the level of hostility is low, and life is peaceful, the budget is small (100 million).

As such, the defense budget awarded by the game is an indicator of the policy intent of neighboring countries. If they are peaceful, the budget will be small; if one or more countries is bent on war, the budget will be large.

Weapons are bought from the USA, UK, France or a private arms dealer. (Each country sells weapons that it itself produces, except the private dealer, who is a South African providing access to Soviet weaponry.) Each source offers a different range of weapons with different prices and most countries will only offer better weapons once a reasonable number of purchases have already been made (which establishes that a relationship has been built). Not all countries offer all the same weapons; for example, anti-SAM helicopters are only available from the USA and the private dealer.

The weapon systems available for normal combat are:
Main battle tanks (USA/UK/Private Dealer)
Medium tanks (France)
Light tanks (UK/France)
Anti-tank helicopters (USA)
SAM launchers (USA/Private Dealer)
Fighter aircraft (USA/France/Private Dealer)
Bomber aircraft (USA/UK/Private Dealer)
Specialized-function weapon systems available are:
AWACS aircraft (USA/UK)
Strike aircraft (USA)
Anti-SAM helicopters (USA/Private Dealer)
Weapon types are identical as far as war is concerned, regardless of their price: so the 1M USD T-62 Main Battle Tank from the private dealer is exactly the same as the 2M USD M1A1 Main Battle Tank from the USA. Price differences can be significant over a few turns; for example, fighters are 39M USD each from the USA but only 35M USD each from France. Also, the French “medium tank” functions exactly the same as the other dealers’ “heavy tanks”.

All weapons purchased by the user will be available by the next turn, except from the private dealer, which usually takes 1-2 turns to ship. The private dealer’s advantage is the ability to sell arms to the player if an arms embargo is imposed on Israel.

Nuclear Weapon Research
Another factor in the game is the development of nuclear weapons. Each country (except Jordan and Lebanon) can begin and maintain a nuclear weapon development program. One of the main ways to lose the game is for WMDs to be used, which often sets off a global nuclear holocaust. This can present a problem to players, since it can be other countries that use WMDs in their own conflicts against countries other than Israel. It is possible to reduce this possibility by destroying nuclear installations as they arise.

On each turn, the player decides whether to fund nuclear development for that month (it only costs 20M USD and so is usually done). Once the player has nuclear weapons ready, they are able to fire them during war at their discretion. Depending on the situation of the war, the player’s use of WMDs will either result in an instant victory or a nuclear holocaust, which ends the game in a loss. Consequently, if the player wins a war using a nuclear strike, the UN will impose an arms embargo on Israel, forcing the player to buy arms from the private dealer until the next UN summit.

Copyright (C) Wikipedia

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